Why a Wine Cellar is the Best Place to Store Your Wine

Any wine connoisseur dreams of having a wine cellar in their own home. As wine cellars are becoming increasingly popular for many conventional homeowners, it’s never too late to get one installed in your home!

Read on to discover why upgrading from a wine rack or wine cabinet to a wine cellar is the best place to store your wine.

Arrange into categories

If your collection of wine is continuously growing, having a built-in wine cellar in your house is the perfect way to organise your wine. You can arrange your wine into categories, such as colour, age, region and even different occasions. Organising your wine makes it easier for you to choose and get access to the bottle you wish to drink for a special event or even just to sip leisurely.

Avoid direct sunlight

Wine cellars can prevent and protect your wine from coming in to contact with sunlight. The UV rays from sunlight can cause damage to your wine and speed up premature ageing. As every room in a house has windows, the wine on the wine racks or wine cabinets will inevitably be exposed to the natural light.

It is, therefore, best to keep wine cellars in darkness and away from sunlight, you’ll need to have some form of light to see and pick a bottle of wine when a guest comes around. It is recommended to use a LED light source for your wine cellar, as minimal heat is emitted from the bulb. An LED bulb also prevents temperature fluctuations, as well as eliminating wine degradation and the build-up of moisture.

Prevents temperature fluctuations

Changes in the temperature can have a negative impact on the wine’s ageing and chemical process. A wine cellar will be a great solution to keep the temperature mild, constant and controlled. Although you are able to control the temperature and store wine in wine fridges or coolers. They’re not ideal for storing wine in the long-term as they produce heat, whereas with wine cellars, considering they’re in an environment with a controlled temperature and other optimal cellar conditions, you can store your collection of wine for many years.

Optimise humidity levels

Humidity is another factor that affects the condition of the wine. Wine stored in a wine fridge can dehumidify the wine and cause the cork to dry out, but excess humidity offers the perfect condition for mould to grow and destroy wine labels. With a wine cellar, you can control the moisture in a room to the optimal level – it is recommended that the wine should be at 70% humidity.

Reduced vibrations

Vibrations can accelerate the ageing process of wine and speed the chemical reactions, which decreases the quality of the wine. No matter whether it is accidental, or if you have limited room to move around freely, you can create vibrations by bumping into the side of the table where the wine racks are placed or nudging wine cabinets. A wine cellar can minimise vibrations, and thus allowing you to store your wine for longer.

Increase the price of your home

You can increase the price of your home if you build your own wine cellar. All you need is a basement, small room, or garage – you can even consider extending your home if you do not have space. There are many wine enthusiasts who would love to live in a house with an area that’s dedicated to wine. With the in-built wine cellar, they could be willing to pay more for your property as this feature is rarely offered to the housing marketing.

The Best Materials to Use for your Wine Rack

Finding the perfect storage solution for your wine collection can be an intimidating job with so many aspects to deliberate and choices to decide between. To make this job a tiny bit easier for you, we have put together our first ultimate guide to choosing the best materials for wine racks. Carry on reading to find out what type of material will best suit your wine rack needs.

Wood

There are only a select few types of wood that are suitable to be used for a wine rack, the most popular types of wood being Redwood and Mahogany. These two kinds of wood are extremely resistant to rotting, decay and infestation. They also have no characteristic odour associated with them, which is extremely important when it comes to wine racks as you do not want the smell to start affecting the wine.

Oak is also a popular option for making wine racks, especially oak from reclaimed oak barrels. These can look extremely pleasing and sometimes even give off the smell of an old wine cellar. Oak is used for kit and custom racks but can be hard to work with as it is extremely dense.

Metal

If you intend to store your treasured wine bottles in a smaller area, such as a closet or in a cupboard or small kitchen, metal wine racks may be the best solution for you. Metal racks are typically thinner than those made from wood, which normally ends up saving you some space – making metal wine racks appealing for those with less room in their home. Compared to wooden racks, metal racks are usually easier to build – which can make moving furniture about the house quicker and easier. As well as this, metal wine racks are commonly used for their aesthetic features and fit in well with more contemporary styled rooms.

Plastic

A modern addition to your kitchen, living room or restaurant, plastic wine racks offer functionality and elegance. Plastic is a safer and cheaper substitute for purchasing glass, as well as being lighter to move and reposition. If you’re an avid wine drinker, a plastic wine rack is a great way to store your wine and show off your collection when your friends come over for those popular parties you are famous for hosting. Or you may even just want to display the latest promotional offers and deals on wines of the week in your corner shop – the design of plastic wine racks makes it super easy to change up displays without any hassle. Plastic wine racks come in a selection of sizes and shapes, storing up to six bottles of wine comfortably.

Despite being lightweight, plastic wine racks are incredibly durable and can withstand impact and weight easily without risking damage to the rack itself or the bottles. What’s more, plastic is easy to clean with just a wipe of a damp cloth, so any spillages can be removed efficiently without the need for chemical cleaners.

How to Organise your Wine Collection

For those passionate about wine, finding a dedicated space for their collection by investing in high-quality wine racks, or better yet, entire wine cellars is essential. However, there is no point forking out on gorgeous wine storage without first deciding upon the best way to organise the bottles themselves.

How you choose to do so is entirely up to you and will certainly depend upon your collection size; but organising by type, grape variety, region and age are generally the most common ways to categorise.

Type

Organising wines by type is great for people with smaller collections and those who are not too picky regarding grape variety or pairings. Amateur collectors can’t go wrong when organising straightforwardly by reds, whites, roses, sparkling and dessert wines.

Grape Variety

The next step up is to arrange by grape variety, allowing collectors to organise more precisely. This ensures your Rieslings are not mixed in with your chardonnays, or your Shiraz bottles with your Sauvignons. Moreover, organising by variety makes food pairings easier and will ensure maximum efficiency when it comes to selecting your perfect bottle for any occasion.

Region

For many wine collectors, there is a tendency to sway towards certain preferred wine regions. If this is you, it might make more sense to organise your collection by grape location, allowing you to group together your favourite bottles based on the country or particular region of origin.

Age

For anyone serious about wine collecting, the age of your wines is a very important factor, particularly since many are supposed to be stored for years in order to reach their peak.

As such, you can also organise large collections based on ideal drinking dates, by keeping ready-to-drink bottles closer to the top, and the ones you do not wish to touch for quite some time at the bottom of the wine rack, or the harder-to-reach areas of the cellar.

This will ensure you are serving wine at their perfect peaks, preventing any undesirable premature openings!

Price

It is more than likely that you will have at least a couple of very expensive bottles within your collection, which you might be saving for a special occasion. We recommend storing your priciest bottles or most superior vintages at the bottom levels of your wine racks or cellar so that you do not find yourself drinking them on an impulse.

Nobody wants to spend a significant amount of time searching for the perfect bottle, particularly when you have guests to host, which is why organising your wine collection is vital for both efficiency and decorative purposes.

At the end of the day, there is no right or wrong way to categorise your bottles – it is simply about finding what works for you.

The Benefits of Having a Wine Cellar Installed

While they were previously considered a luxury interior feature for the mega-rich, bespoke wine cellars are now becoming increasingly popular among ordinary homeowners, particularly those who have a penchant for collecting many bottles over several years. We outline the top benefits of having a wine cellar fitted in your home.

Keeps wine unspoiled

Any wine connoisseur worth their title knows that there are very specific conditions in which wine should be stored to prevent it from going bad, which is why having a cellar fitted by a professional is highly beneficial.

An expert wine cellar fitter knows the optimal temperature and humidity controlled environment needed to properly store wine and will advise you to include cellar conditioners, whilst ensuring the materials used and product dimensions within the cellar are all fit for purpose.

While wine fridges or coolers may be used by those with a hobby who want to store a few bottles for drinking sooner rather than later, they are not ideal for storing wine long-term since they have been known to produce heat. Instead, serious wine collectors will want to have a wine cellar fitted, which is ideal for storing and preserving bottles for years to come.

Organisation

Built-in home wine cellars are a great way to organise your inventory in one place and means you are aware of exactly which wines you have acquired over time. This means you have easy and direct access to any given bottle and can plan when to drink them based on peak ageing and quality.

For those amongst us who are lucky enough to have a very large collection and a big wine cellar, there is also technology available to help with coordinating and categorising bottles, making life easier.

Adds value to your home

Having a home wine cellar will undoubtedly add extra value to your property, whether it be extending an existing area of the home, such as the basement, or planning a wine cellar for a new build. Any person serious about wine would be thrilled at the chance to live in a home with a built-in area for their passion, meaning someone could be willing to pay far more for your property with that extra feature.

Moreover, hiring an expert to fit a bespoke wine cellar means you are able to choose the materials and features you would like and which perfectly suits the style and interior of your home.

Increases your knowledge

Taking your wine collection seriously by having a cellar installed can only serve to enhance your knowledge and fascination with the world of wine. This may also affect your travel choices as you seek to visit international wine regions and local vineyards in order to update and add to your collection.

Moreover, wine cellars look seriously impressive and are a great way to show off both your cellar and your skillset to dinner guests. Why not even go one step further and think about installing a tasting table?

Lowers costs

People with ample room to store their prized wines normally find that they save money in the long run, by purchasing vintages when they are reasonably priced and keeping them stored in their cellar for future investment when they reach peak ageing. Having a bigger space also allows collectors to buy wine in bulk cases rather than in single bottles, also lowering purchase costs.

Get in touch with us on +44 (0)115 944 1434 for advice on wine cellars or discuss your needs.

Why you should use a Wine Rack in your Home

 

Wine is the crème de la crème of the party beverage. Going to a party? Buy a bottle of wine. Fancy a night in and a microwave meal? Bottle of wine, please. Meeting your partner’s family for dinner around their house? You got it, wine me up. But if a wine bottle is not stored properly, it can lose a lot of its colour and taste. This is why you need a wine rack to store all of your bottles and make sure that you do not dish out dodgy wine when you start hitting those summer garden parties, whether it be a solid pine wine rack or a gleaming metal wine rack. Not convinced about whether you should use a wine rack or not? Here is why you definitely should use a wine rack and what is the best type wine rack to get.

There are, of course, many ways that you can store wine, but the general consensus is that the best and easiest way to store your wine is through a wine rack. Wine racks make sure that your wine is safe when stored, even if that is only for a short amount of time. You must also worry about the condition that wine is stored in to make sure it matures properly such as temperature, light condition, humidity and movement. So make sure you keep these conditions in mind when picking out the size and shape of your wine rack too!

The most important factor when choosing a wine rack is, of course, finding one that will store your wine properly. The style of wine racks available to the casual wine drinker is increasing dramatically. There are now styles such as wall mounts, side mounts and stack systems, all coming in various different shapes and sizes and holding as little as three bottles or as many as a hundred.

The reason you should be investing in a horizontal wine rack in order to store your wine properly is that a horizontal wine rack will prevent the cork from drying out and start to shrink which brings air into the bottle of wine and will ruin it. Vertical racks are fine for storing wines for short periods of time., but if you are looking to lay down a bottle of wine for a month or more then you will be in danger of ruining that bottle. It is, therefore, commonly argued that horizontal racks are the best racks for storing wine as it is better to be safe than sorry if you don’t know when you are going to be cracking open the next bottle, it is better to leave it in a horizontal position. Horizontal racks are also easily added to if you feel you need more bottle spaces.

Not only do you have to pick the shape of your wine rack, but it is also important to think about what materials you would like your wine rack to be made out of. Wine racks can be finished in a range of materials. You can normally select the materials, style, design and colour of your rack when going to the right supplier. This can include a large variety of woods and stains, recyclable materials or metal. If you want to hang racks on the walls, especially smaller ones as decoration, you should consider racks made of lighter materials to avoid causing to damage the walls.

No matter what size your wine collection is, you can find the right rack for your lovely home. A little bit of time and effort into making sure you know what you want can go a long way to give you the collection of your dreams.

Five Facts You Never Knew About Wine

  1. The Romans came up with the notion of toasting wine

That’s right, not only did the Romans invent concrete, sewers, roads, the calendar, the newspaper and underfloor heating, but they even invented the toast! And who would have guessed that it actually involved real toasted bread! It apparently originated when the Senate made it a requirement that emperor Augusts be honoured with a toast at every meal. They would drop a piece of burnt toast (known as the tostus) into a glass of wine to disguise the wine’s disagreeable flavours and then raise a glass to the guest of honour.

  1. The world’s oldest bottle is… really old

The Speyer wine bottle was uncovered in Germany in 1867 and is believed to be from 325 AD! If this is correct, it is the oldest known unopened bottle of wine in the world. The bottle was discovered during an excavation within a 4th-century AD Roman nobleman’s tomb. One source says the man was a Roman legionary and the wine was a provision for his celestial journey. We know wine is meant to improve with age but we think you might be better off missing this one out if someone starts handing out glasses of this wine!

  1. But it’s not as old as the world’s oldest wine…

The world’s oldest bottle of wine might be almost 1,700 years old, but scientists have recently revealed that they have found pottery fragments which show the earliest evidence of grape wine-making. The fragments are believed to be 8,000 years old and were discovered in two Neolithic villages, called Gadachrili Gora and Shulaveris Gora. The world’s earliest non-grape based wine is understood to be a fermented alcoholic mixture of rice, honey and fruit dating back to 7,000 BC in China.

 

  1. Tutankhamun loved his wine

Egypt dominated the wine trade between 1550 and 1070 BC, and the Egyptians went about improving it as much as they could. They first created amphorae to make the transportation of wine easier and then they created the wine label. It seems that the 19-year-old King Tut was a fan of the alcoholic grape-based beverage as there were 26 amphorae found in his tomb alongside a wide array of other artefacts. The amphorae were all labelled with extremely specific details regarding the year the wine was made, where it was made, who made it and even the style of wine. They had a rating system of good, great or excellent wine (does this mean they never made a bad bottle?). We wonder if they could have done with some wooden oak wine racks, as the amphorae don’t seem to be very neatly placed!

  1. Some people have a wine phobia

This uncommon fear is called Oenophobia and is the irrational fear of wine. People with Oenophobia have a paralysing fear of seeing the consumption of wine, wine bottles and spilt wine. The disease is related with methyphobia (fear of alcoholic beverages). In both of these cases, the person with the phobia often dislikes these alcoholic drinks as they are afraid that they may suffer severe poisoning when consuming them. Even the idea of this can cause extreme anxiety, tremors, respiratory problems, abdominal pain and nausea.

Constantine Bay Stores Wine Racking By A & W MOORE WINERACKS

A & W MOORE are proud to reveal the New Retail Wine Racking for the Constantine Bay Stores (Padstow, Cornwall. PL28 8JJ). Which displays over a hundred different varieties of wine.

The friendly and helpful staff would be pleased to see you to discuss your wine requirements or visit their website www.constantinebaystores.com to find out more.

If you are interested in having your shop fitted out with Wine Storage display racking  check out our  full details of A & W Moore’s Retail Wine Racking at  www.wineracks.co.uk/wine-racks-range/shop-restaurant-bar-racks/

or simply give us a Call  or Email and see how we can help you. Tel: 01159441434  Email: information@wineracks.co.uk

 

A Guide to Wine Storage, From A&W Moore

One of the most important ways to keep your wine in optimum condition is to store it correctly. It’s not as simple as throwing a few bottles on to a wine rack. No, there are a few more things to consider. Use our handy guide, to make sure that your fine wines are being stored correctly.

The first thing that you should think about is the ‘climate’ of your wine cellar. Climate is made up of the temperature and the humidity. They work closely together, to ensure that your wine ages well.

 

Temperature

This is the most critical element of your wine cellar. Try to keep the temperature of your wine cellar as constant as possible. Ideally, aim for between 10 and 14 degrees centigrade. The cellar should absolutely never reach higher than 25 degrees centigrade. If wines are exposed to temperatures that are too high, this will age them prematurely.

 

Humidity

The next vital factor for creating and ideal climate in your wine cellar is to control the humidity.

Why is humidity important?

Humidity is the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere.

If humidity is too low…

If the humidity of the cellar is too low, organic corks may begin to dry out. If this happens, oxygen may get into the wine.

If humidity is too high…

There is also a risk to the quality of your wine, if the humidity in your cellar is too high. Firstly, the moisture will spoil the labels on the bottles. Secondly and more importantly, there is a possibility that you are creating the optimum conditions for fungus to grow on your wine bottles.

Controlling humidity can be tricky. However, a simple solution from A&W Moore is a cellar conditioner, which has amazing dual functionality – controlling both temperature and humidity. It can be tempting to buy a regular air conditioner but unfortunately, they can make the atmosphere too dry, as they are not designed for your wine cellar specific needs.

 

Lighting

The darkness of your cellar is a huge factor in ensuring that your wine is stored correctly. Ultraviolet light can be detrimental to the quality of your wine. It’s important to note than some wines are more susceptible to degradation than others but they all need to be protected. There is science behind ultraviolet light’s effect on wine but it’s quite easy to understand. First of all, the excessive exposure is called ‘lightstrike’. The UV light reacts with the wine, creating compounds which destroy the taste. Along with ensuring a dark environment, wines in coloured glass stand a much better chance of avoiding lightstrike.

 

Successful wine storage takes some practice and planning, but when it’s done correctly, it is a satisfying and rewarding activity. You’ll enjoy the maximum benefit from the wines you invest in, when it has the best conditions to mature in.

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